Monday, July 2, 2012

Book Review: Finn Family Moomintroll (The Moomins #3) by Tove Jansson


Description (from Goodreads):

It is spring in the valley and the Moomins are ready for adventure! Moomintroll and his friends Snufkin and Sniff find the Hobgoblin's top hat, all shiny and new and just waiting to be taken home. They soon realize that his is no ordinary hat; it can turn anything—or anyone—into something else!

My thoughts:

Moomins must be one of the greatest fictional creations EVER. They were a HUGE part of my childhood and I am happy to see, that they are still part of the life of little children. But also adults are obsessed about them, collecting everything from Moomin mugs to curtains and duvet covers. We even have Moomin soda and Moomin candy in pretty much every single grocery store here in Finland.

For many (at least foreigners) The Moomins are the most familiar from the the Japanese animation series - it is this series the children usually see when they are small and get familiar with the Moomins. The series is based on these gorgeous, imaginative novels by Tove Jansson, one of my favorite writers of all time. With Moomins she has created a fictional world I will never forget.

The Moomins are there curious, lovable creatures who live in the Moomin valley. Moominpappa and mamma, their song Moomintroll and his friends are always up for adventure. They do not have to lock their doors for the night and visitors are always welcome to their house - they just make a new bed to one of the room of their house and welcome everyone with open arms. They see good even in the ones others despise. 

In this particular novel by Jansson, Moomintroll and his friend Snufkin find a black top hat and take it home - this is the beginning of a series of unusual events in the life of the Moomin family; they fly on clouds that come out of the hat, they turn the river water into raspberry juice, they play in a jungle and do so much more. But it is not all fun and games - Moomintroll transforms into someone no one recognizes and sudden visitors bring new event so the Moominland. But of course, everything is solved and everyone is happy (well, not maybe the Muskrat, but on the other hand, he is so pessimistic he does not feel happiness). 

What I love most about the Moomins is the blurred line between the so-called children and adults. For example Hemulen seems to be an adult, but the is always playing with the "children". The same is with Snork and Snufkin (Snufkin for example travels alone every winter, but every summer he spends with his best friend, Moomintroll). In the Moomins children can act like adults when needed and the adults can act like children. They spend their days on little adventures, writing their memoirs, playing and helping others. It feels like they have found the perfect balance. If only we all could live like that.

Are you familiar with the Moomins? I would love to know if readers from different countries are familiar with these beautiful stories I grew up with. 

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